12 February 2017

Pre-Anniversary and Anniversary ``bishop''

Bishop is written bezup in Pre-Anniversary and bezop in Anniversary, where z is sh [1]. Why is this? I pronounce bishop with a u sound. One reason I can think of for using the o is that it is easier to write that way.

[1]: http://repo.or.cz/gregg.git/blob/HEAD:/dicts/ags.markdown

4 comments:

  1. Because it is easier to write and remember, and it also avoids a spelling mistake in transcription. The same thing happens with the -ture ending. "Picture" should be written "p-k-ch-reverse e" or "p-k-ch-r" if we follow phonetics, but it is written "p-k-t-r."

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  2. It sure looks like an "ish" to me, checking the dictionary. I would never have noticed it as an "s."

    Where did you see this broken down as such?

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    Replies
    1. It's the sh -- Paul is using the z symbol for sh. He's referring to the vowel.

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  3. Okay, I misunderstood.

    Paul, you'll run across numerous cases where a vowel is used that doesn't fit within the three categories each is assigned in the Manual.

    Just peruse the Anni dictionary under the "A" column. You'll find examples like "aluminum," "anomaly," "apart." None of these fall into the short, medium, or long "a" sound; they're closer to short "u" or even the schwa.

    Oftentimes, the way the outline is rendered just harks back to the ordinary longhand spelling. But it all makes sense in the long run.

    Sometimes it's used to distinguish words close in pronunciation, or even homonyms in certain contexts. Ex: In "affect" the "a" vowel is added to distinguish from "effect" where the vowel is omitted. Here again, the "a" doesn't fit any of the three broad categories.

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